Why I walk

Track at Rowarth, near New Mills, Derbyshire
Pulling out of Rowarth, near New Mills. Still very grumpy. An interesting old track..

I am deeply, madly, emphatically in love with walking. You might have gathered that from the website and blog so far. I tone this down because enthusiasts can be quite annoying, but it does energise and infuse all my coaching work with clients. So here’s three reasons why I walk. There’s way more reasons than three, but I’ve stopped there today because of the aforementioned annoyingness. I’ll tell you a few more in another post.

Kinder plateau from Lantern Pike
Kinder plateau viewed from Lantern Pike. Hard not to be impressed.

It’s a great transition into the working week

I walk often and at all sorts of different times of the day, but I have one walking appointment that I always, always keep. And that’s first thing on Monday morning.

On Monday mornings I am mind-crushingly grumpy. I love my job (or more accurately, jobs), but I still find that waking up on Monday morning is like being thrown out of an airplane, as I once heard it described. This gets better or worse sending on how much work I have on (and that’s another story…), but a few years ago I discovered that if I put my horrified disgruntled-ness on one side, threw on clothes and breakfast, and headed straight out into the early morning hills, I returned a different person. Everything was just the same – the work, the multiple jobs, the crammed headspace and organisational skills required for these. But I was able to look more calmly and constructively at them. Sometimes I could make changes, sometimes not, but it either case, I was in a better place to think it through. The science supports this of course, but this is how that science plays out in my life.

Combes Rocks
Bewitched. Coombes Rocks. A finger of dark rock flanked by curved valleys.

It shifts my perspective of where I am in the world, opens up new possibilities

We all have a map in our heads of the places that are important to us. And these mental maps differ in all sorts of ways from actual, accurate, written-down maps. For instance, Macclesfield in my head is much bigger than London, even though an actual map would tell you that was daft. But my Macclesfield is full of detail and texture that London does not have. I believe clever people call this psychogeography. When I first started to walk a lot around where I live, I found a strange thing happening. Places that seemed far apart in my mental map turned out to be quite close. I’d always thought of Buxton as a good drive away from Macclesfield, but walking regularly on the moors between them told me that in fact in some places they are only about seven miles apart, and more significantly, walking that seven miles somehow draws the two places together. My view of the world around me has become less fragmented. I don’t know why I find this delightful. Perhaps cars and trains do fragment our lives. But also it may be that if I can shift my perspective on the physical landscape around me, then perhaps it will open up the possibility of seeing other things in a different way. And I find that infinitely refreshing.

Manchester from Combes Rocks
Manchester from Coombes Rocks. The rain hasn’t done with me yet it seems..

It structures loneliness into solitude, which is an altogether more constructive state

At one time I found myself working on my own a lot. My contacts were mainly on the phone our my email – there were plenty of those – but mainly my workmates were virtual people. I was lonely.

This isn’t always an easy thing to change, and also, you know, I like my own company. But walking gave me some time during the week that was a positive, steadily paced time to do nothing much but just be alone in nature. It was a time marked for the presence of something – solitude – rather than its lack of people.

In have more people in my life now, but I still find solitude a constructive experience. It recharges the brain and the soul and makes me feel more like a proper human being in the world.

Robin Hood's Picking Rods, Derbyshire
Robin Hood’s Picking Rods. Honestly. Actually the remains of an 8th Century double cross. At least two more of these in the area.

So those are just some of the reasons why I walk, and why it has come to underpin my coaching work. For more reasons, including how the ‘story’ of the walk helps frame my thoughts; how each walk is a small confidence building adventure (especially if you are afraid of cows), and the pleasure of getting to know people while walking, stay tuned.

Or you could sign up to receive notifications of when I post by going to any page on my website and scrolling down to grey bar at the bottom, and clicking on the ‘Follow’ link on the left.

In the meantime I’ve love to know why you walk…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s