Quizzical landscapes, curious lives…

Chrome Hill near Buxton on a misty morning
Chrome Hill near Buxton on a misty morning

Some landscapes make you ask questions. There’s a spot between Buxton, Flash and Chrome Hill where I experience this intensely. From Axe Edge, I can see several long, sharp slivers of rock pointing up to the sky. Are they natural or chipped out of the rock by ancient humans? There’s lots of quarrying around here – it could be either. Sometimes mist settles in the dips and all you can see are the strange lumpy peaks poking up through a blanket of mist.

Looking at the map, it’s noticeable that the local pathways multiply in this area to become a tangled mass of tracks, footpaths, bridleways and byways. There are several 5-8 way junctions, and in one place four footpaths wind in parallel through a single narrow valley. The river Dove rises here, and near Tenterhill, far away from the road, there’s a robust stone packhorse bridge over the river, designed to take some heavy use that it doesn’t get now.

The packhorse bridge over the River Dove near Tenterhill, Buxton
The packhorse bridge over the river Dove near Tenterhill, Buxton

Here you start to see pale limestone crust the hillsides, rather than the darker millstone grit, and the land is arranged into narrow valleys and hidden ravines that can take you by surprise. Some of the house and farms seem suspended mid-renovation, but they are places full of recycled invention and creative husbandry. The other day we came across a pig in a cosy handmade shed, and some extraordinary bear-like sheep flourishing around Howe Green. And up near Dove Head, a memorial stands in what seems like the middle of nowhere commemorating the men and boys who lived and worked in communities on Brandside who died in the two World Wars.

The bear-sheep of Howe Green, near Buxton. Anyone know what breed these are?
The bear-sheep of Howe Green, near Buxton. Anyone know what breed these are?

The look and shape of the land is, of course, bound up with the people who used it in the past and the people who use it now as well as the ancient seas that lay down sediment, the ice that scraped it out and the human events that tore it apart and put it back together. Walking the land is more than a means to get fit or feel good – it’s a participation in a small way in a place formed from world shaking events and everyday human use, and as such I like to think that sometimes the thinking that happens in these amazing places works its way back into the world for practical good.

If you feel it’s a good time to do some work on how your own hopes and aspirations could leak out into the wider world, I’ve got a special 60% off spring offer on 1-1 coaching walks. Book by the end of May 2018 for a session that can take place any time this year.

To book, contact me – Victoria – at info@natural-thinking.co.uk, or call 01625 425049 and quote ’Spring walk’.

Are you fairly confident in your map reading skills and fancy exploring yourself? You can download of copy of the GPX file for this walk here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s