Making stuff happen with group coaching walks

White Nancy from Oakenbank Lane, near Rainow
White Nancy from Oakenbank Lane, near Rainow

I have to admit that when it comes down to it, I can be a bit of an avoider of groups. I lean, in general, towards one to one interactions and very small gatherings.

Having said that, I am not a loner. There are groups that I positively enjoy and seek out. Some are light and energising, and some are rich and complex, and as you might expect, some have a good dose of annoyingness mixed in. Groups can be hard work, frustrating and stifling, but also warm, inclusive and accepting. And there’s not usually a clear, binary division between the two. I’ve come to know that my life is richer for the groups that I am a part of.

Anyway, I’m saying all that because I discovered a wonderful thing about coaching small groups of people, and I have built these experiences into my occasional ‘Making Stuff Happen’ group coaching walks – one of which is coming up in July. Check it out here.

One to one coaching in the outdoors is a wonderful thing. You have the undivided attention of a professional to listen to your goals and gently and almost invisibly structure the conversation to help you work towards these things. And all the time, the outer landscape has a way of reflecting your inner landscape back to you, offering the wider view, a new perspective and a steadying rhythm.

But coaching in a small group also has a kind of magic. In this case, though, the structure must be clearly visible. There has to be a well defined framework to help a group of people who may not know each other come together, and to provide the pegs to hang their questions on.

Waterfall at Walkmill farm, Ingersley Vale, near Bollington, Cheshire
Waterfall at Walkmill farm, Ingersley Vale, near Bollington, Cheshire

It works by pairing people up to explore an opening question, then each pair is changed and the next question asked. At the start, some basic active listening skills are reviewed so that everyone can tune in their listening ear. There are formal and informal moments to enjoy the landscape and give it a chance to impact on your thinking. And a good deal of laughter and lightness too – even when serious issues are discussed.

You may not have the one to one attention and invisible structure of a highly trained coach, but you do gain a supportive network and a variety of experience that brings a bit of ‘otherness’ into the mix. Plus there’s the sense of all working together – even if that is on very different things. It’s amazing how quickly this creates a rich, honest and potentially transformative space.

People I know have used these sessions as an introduction to coaching – as a way to get to know me as a coach and to make a start on articulating and shaping their goals. They may go on to book a one to one session, but equally, a group session may be enough to get started on moving forward and making things happen.

So, if you’d like to give it a try, I’d love to see you there!

Making Stuff Happen Group Coaching Walk

Tuesday July 3rd, 10:00-12:30, Rainow, near Macclesfield
£30

Click here to book

 

Getting Out More

Fun on top of High Stile, the Lake District, England

Even if you love the outdoors, it’s true to say that actually getting out can be a herculean task of time management, list juggling and inertia prodding.

Here are few things that help me to do it. They won’t be right for everyone, but I hope you can find something in here that helps you to get out more too. And please do share any tips that you have – the more perspectives, the richer the picture.

Roman racecourse Whaley Bridge
The ‘Roman racecourse’ at Whaley Bridge that turned out to be a figment of the Victorian imagination

Find walks that interest you

Have you driven past a footpath sign many times and wondered where it goes? Planning walks around your interests can enliven the whole thing with a sense of adventure or exploration. It can be very satisfying to walk all the public footpaths in a particular area – and mark them off as you go. Or investigate a local historical or geological feature. A friend and I had an adventure seeking out the ‘Roman racecourse’ at Whaley Bridge mentioned in J D Sainter’s 1878 book ’Scientific Rambles Around Macclesfield’ (available from Macclesfield Library). Turns out it’s not a Roman racecourse at all, but we had great fun finding it. Finding good walks is the subject of a whole article all to itself – coming up in the near future. Friends, maps, libraries, local groups can all help. But bear in mind that…

Parks count!

If you can’t easily get into the country, it is possible to divert from regular journeys to a park or even tree-lined street. I have two walks to the local shops that give me a dose of green when I need it. One is through a recreation ground and the other has a short section along a tree-lined track by a field.

Fun on top of High Stile, the Lake District, England
Walk with someone else. You can suss a walk out, and have some fun

Walk with someone else first up

A bit of time on your own can be so refreshing, and frankly, if we always had to wait until a suitable companion was available, we might never go. But if you’re not a confident map reader and navigator, or a little afraid of countryside challenges, persuade someone else to plan and take a walk with you, or to take you on one they know already. Next time you can walk it on your own.

Be prepared to go it alone – but check in with someone

Walking on your own is great for thinking things through, and it also means you’re free to go when and where it suits you. But you do need to be aware of any potential risks. A key thing is to tell someone where you’re going, when you’ve left and when you get back. And do it before you leave in case you don’t have a phone signal. Carry enough warm clothes to enable you to comfortably wait for help if you have to, and take a drink and a snack. The Ramblers society has some great tips on safety here.

Keep it regular

Knowing that you’re going out for a walk at a particular time each week helps to minimise the tussle between your desire to get out and your to do list. And on that note…..

Early morning from Teggs Nose Country Park, Macclesfield
A contemplative early morning from Teggs Nose Country Park, Macclesfield

Early mornings rock

I find it much harder to break off from what I’m doing in the middle of the day than to go out first thing before anything else has claimed my headspace. Indeed sometimes before I’m even awake.

Have a sweet suite

Develop a suite of walks that you know like the back of your hand. That way, you can get out there before you’ve been been able to give yourself a reason why you’re too busy. Have a variety to avoid getting bored. And trust me, the weather and season will make a cluster of well walked routes seem like a different drama every time.

Cows near Youlgreave, Derbyshire
Not my favourite thing…

Plan around your challenges and, erm, fears..

In my case, mud and cows. Well mainly cows. Make a note of where they are and minimise your exposure if you can. Start small and then it’s never that far just to go back. You can build up your resistance over time, and you’ll probably surprise yourself. In my case, I started to overcome my fear of cows when I started doing long distance walks. If found that faced with extending a long walk when I was tired, cows don’t seem so scary. Nor mud so intimidating now I come to think of it.

By the way, the Ramblers offers some smart advice on how to walk around livestock

Use paper AND tech

Some people claim that if you can’t use a map and a compass, you shouldn’t be out in the countryside. While heading out on three hour hike on the moors with just a phone map is downright silly, the maps and apps available for mobiles today can be a godsend to boost confidence and confirm that you’re on the right track. The great thing about a paper map is that you can’t break it by dropping it in a puddle, and its battery doesn’t go flat when it’s cold, or if you look at the screen too often. And they’re much better for planning. The great thing about the map on your phone is that you can zoom in to make it bigger, and that it will tell you where you actually are. Why not have both I say.

So those are my tips for getting out more.  Even on a day that’s grisly with rain, a bit of headspace and some different scenery can lift the mood and help to cast a more positive light on tricky issues or everyday gripes. And on a sunny day, the spirit can soar….

Worth every second of the time it takes to get out there.

How do you do it? I’d love to know what works best for you.

Fancy getting out more and thinking things through with a skilled coach?  Book a coaching walk here