Natural Thinking and COVID-19, staying safe and staying well

Teggs Nose Country Park, Macclesfield October 2019

Natural Thinking has been taking a break from coaching walks in line government guidance regarding Covid-19. However, phone or video coaching is now available to everyone, whether or not you have attended a coaching walk before. You can find out how to book here

I’m also offering critical workers, as defined so by the UK government, access to free phone or video sessions subject to available time slots. I’m aiming to make up to three sessions a week available in this way, and I’m keeping this offer open until June for now. We’ll review it then in line with the ongoing Covid situation.

In the meantime, I hope you are managing to stay safe, well and positive in these tricky times. In particular of course, I hope you are able to get your once a day exercise.

Primroses, Spring 2020

I am all too aware how lucky I am to live in a place where I can access green space, and I hope that is the case for you too. I long for the hills, but I’ve been surprised by the number of green spaces in Macclesfield that I either didn’t know about or hadn’t taken the time to explore.  So hurray for parks, green verges and greenways (obvs no sunbathing though!). And I find it altogether heartening that nature is just getting on with things despite our own turmoil and upheavals.

Exercise boosts our health and wellbeing and walking in green spaces can sooth the soul and improve clarity and thinking, and this is is backed up by science too (well, I’m not sure about the soul bit – that’s more poetic). I wrote about this here if you want to know more. So if you are able do get out for a walk, run or cycle, whatever the terrain. If you’ve access to green space, then join me in getting out there in gratefulness for what we have.

And of course, there’s always the possiblity of using a phone or video coaching session alongside your daily walk to do a little quality thinking about where you’re at…..

Borrowdale November 2019

The Story of the Walk

wild garlic near Bakewell in Derbyshire
Meandering through wild garlic near Bakewell in Derbyshire

All my walks have their own story. The route, the weather, the mud, the café, the companions, the cows (or hopefully not..), the copulating frogs, the wild garlic, the wood anemones, the lamb carcass 6 foot up in a tree (I know, ugh. I’m not sure what this says about our Cheshire buzzards). You know the kind of thing.

But there’s another story that is woven in with this one – the stuff I bring in my head. And with this stuff, I notice a pattern, a rough gathering together into a beginning, middle and end that echoes the unfolding of the walk.

The River Wye from Monsal Head
The river Wye from near Monsal Head. Each season tells a different story…

After I set off but before I get going, there’s a sense of meeting myself in that place. Are my feet comfy in these shoes, am I tired, grumpy or does my back ache? What have I got to do this week, who’s annoying me, what tricky interactions have I got to manage? Why can’t I get enthused about gardening these days and why am I avoiding painting and decorating the bathroom?

As the walk goes on there’s a kind of settling. My body gets used to the pace, I warm up, I adjust my shoes and get my hair out of my face. Many thoughts fall away and I’m absorbed in finding the way and a steady, gently paced examination of the things that have remained. Inner thoughts and outer experience are woven together, holding each other in a comfortable relationship. There may be special revelations, or maybe not. Often it’s about noticing the line of molehills in a field or a weird cloud formation as much as realising that I could approach a problem with my work in a different way.

As the walk draws to a close, thoughts turn to food, fireside, ice cream (delete according to season) or the drive home. Or what’s got to happen next. There’s a kind of line drawn under the space, maybe with a colon pointing to what’s next:

muddy path near Wincle, Macclesfield
Alas, the story of my walking often includes a chapter on mud…although carefully avoided for my coaching clients!

This is not to say that I come away from a walk with all the answers to my questions, but that the mishmash of worries, ideas, interests and just plain chaff is settled into a framework that allows me to hold it all there for a while while I think about what to do with it.

One of the things that I do as a coach is to create a space and a structure for my clients to examine their own thoughts and decide what’s important. Answers or advice are less important than creating a constructive, fruitful space full of the potential for brilliant thinking.

It’s my experience that a walk has many of these characteristics too, albeit in an informal way. This is the raison d’être for Natural Thinking, my coaching business. Working with a coach provides a respectful companion with a listening ear and a sheaf of techniques to enhance your thinking, and bringing this together with being outside is what I do.

wood anemones near Lyme Park, Cheshire
Wood anemones in flower, near Lyme Park in Cheshire

But the joy of walking is that it’s available for free to those who are inclined and able to get out in some way. A walk is a natural coach.

I bet those of you who walk regularly – and I know many of you do – have noticed this or something like it. I’d love to hear about your experiences if you’d like to share them.